9
23 Jul 14 at 8 pm

musicfides:

The first track to be taken from Primitive and Deadly.
Due for release on September 2nd 2014 via Southern Lord Recordings.

 36274
22 Jul 14 at 12 am

THE NORTH REMEMBERS

(Source: alicexz, via vulture-kvlture)


THE NORTH REMEMBERS
 6813
20 Jul 14 at 11 am

blackgoldofthesun:

sunn o)))

Advert, Crawdaddy Magazine, January 1968

(via dogshit420)

blackgoldofthesun:

sunn o)))
Advert, Crawdaddy Magazine, January 1968
 283
20 Jul 14 at 11 am

i-skate-n-shit:

chris cole 

(via underthefreezingmoon)

i-skate-n-shit:


chris cole ✌
codeorangekids:

codeorangekids:

I Am King - September 2nd



pre order here: http://store.deathwishinc.com/product/DW161v.html
 129
13 Jul 14 at 11 pm

justinfriskie:

Fucked Up
June 10 2014
The Rivoli

(via overdosehere)

 3235
09 Jul 14 at 2 am

And you can tell Rolling Stone magazine that my last words were… I’m on drugs!!!

(Source: summerfinns, via twentyfourhoursofrubbish)

"Amerijuanican"
Bongzilla
Amerijuanican
(197) plays
 6
09 Jul 14 at 2 am

mildredpiercex:

i so bored today ahgghghhg

mildredpiercex:

i so bored today ahgghghhg
 78852
08 Jul 14 at 11 am

objectoccult:

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays. With the help of a special device, banned bootlegged jazz and rock ‘n’ roll records were “pressed” on thick radiographs salvaged from hospital waste bins and then cut into discs of 23-25 centimeters in diameter. “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole,” says author Anya von Bremzen. “You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan — forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.”

(via earthwormm)

objectoccult:

Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays. With the help of a special device, banned bootlegged jazz and rock ‘n’ roll records were “pressed” on thick radiographs salvaged from hospital waste bins and then cut into discs of 23-25 centimeters in diameter. “They would cut the X-ray into a crude circle with manicure scissors and use a cigarette to burn a hole,” says author Anya von Bremzen. “You’d have Elvis on the lungs, Duke Ellington on Aunt Masha’s brain scan — forbidden Western music captured on the interiors of Soviet citizens.”